Home Peoples Publications Seminar Job 弱视漫谈

                                   ************Previous Seminar Information************


5/15/2015

Enhancing long-term memory with stimulation tunes visual attention in one trial

by: Zhang Pan


5/8/2015

Frequency-specific hippocampal-prefrontal interactions during associative learning

by: Yan Fangfang


2015/4/24 (Fri.)

Presenter: Zhang Peiyuan

Paper1: A neural model of two-interval discrimination.

Paper2: value-guided choice explained by neural model.


2015/4/17 (Fri.)

Presenter: Xi Jie

Paper title: What does gamma coherence tell us about inter-regional neural communication?


2015/4/10 (Fri.)

Presenter: Lin Borong

Paper title: The dissociable effects of punishment and reward on motor learning


2015/4/2 (Fri.)

Presenter: Jia Wuli

Paper title: Attention alters orientation processing in the human lateral geniculate nucleus


2015/3/27 (Fri.)

Presenter: Chen Ge

Paper title: State-dependent perceptual learning


2015/3/13 (Fri.)

Presenter: Yan Fangfang

Paper title: Effects of Healthy Ageing on Precision and Binding of Object Location in Visual Short Term Memory


2015/3/6 (Fri.)

Presenter: Xi Jie

Paper title: Steady-state contrast response functions provide a sensitive and objective index of amblyopic deficits


2015/1/30 (Fri.)

Presenter: Lin Borong

Paper title: Neural Basis of the Perception and Estimation of Time


2014/1/23 (Fri.)

Presenter: Yan Fangfang

Paper title: Sensory Function and Mental Health Loss & Cognitive and Physical Intervention in Aging


2015/1/16 (Fri.)

Presenter: Zhang Peiyuan

Topic: Topographic Representation of Numerosity in the Human Parietal Cortex


2015/1/9 (Fri.)

Presenter: Chen Ge

Topic: Training Intensity influences perceptual learning

Paper title:

1. Perceptual learning with Chevrons requires a minimal number of trials, transfers to untrained directions, but does not require sleep

2. The time course and specificity of perceptual deterioration

3. Interleaving bisection stimuli – randomly or in sequence – does not disrupt perceptual learning, it just makes it more difficult